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100 - 200 AD


from a perspective of women in the Church


 

Timeline

before Christ
0-100 AD
100-200
200-300
300-400
400-500
500-600
600-700
700-800
800-900
900-1000
1000-1100
1100-1200
1200-1300
1300-1400
1400-1500
1500-1600
1600-1700
1700-1800
1800-1900
1900-1950
1950-2000
2000-2050

 

During this century Christianity spread throughout the Roman Empire. In particular it established deep roots in the hellenistic towns and villages of Syria, Asia Minor (present-day Turkey), Greece and Italy. Hellenists are people who had adopted the Greek culture of the day.

Christians were treated with suspicion by the Roman authorities, by Jewish groups and by the adherents of traditional religions. This led to the first persecutions. Christian communities began to become an underground church. The art of the catacombs reflects this reality.

Meanwhile the Christian faith itself was threatened from within by heresies that distorted the meaning of Christ's message, mainly by Gnosticism which tried to reduce Christian belief to an inner experience of the divine.

Gnostic groups attributed key roles to women in worship. In an overreaction, some Christian leaders began to restrict the ministry of women, taking Jewish or pagan customs as their norm. This can be seen especially in the first letter to Timothy and in an addition to 1 Corinthians.



     

 

 

Women among the disciples of the Apostles

 


80 AD - 120 AD

 

In a reaction against Gnostics, some local Church leaders forbid women to speak in the assemblies.

     

 

Read on women in the second century:

 

 

On Ephesians 'Bride and Bridegroom'

On Luke:

On John:

On Hebrews:

     
     

Women in various ministries

During the second century women deacons continued to serve communities throughout the Christian world of the time. Their ministry ran parallel to another ministry, those of the 'widows'. Though not many records survive of this epoch, its history can somehow be reconstructed.

Pliny reports on the presence of ‘Christians’ in Asia Minor. Among them he found two women who, he says, were called ‘ministrae’, which is a Latin translation of the Greek ‘diakonoi’.


110 AD
Bithynia & Pontus

Fathers of the Church 100 - 200

Their writings exhibit cultural prejudices against women, especially among the Latin speaking Fathers.

140-203
Bishop of Lyons
150-215
Alexandria
155-245
Carthage

 


This website is maintained by the Wijngaards Institute for Catholic Research.

See our Documented Appeal to Pope Francis to Request the Re-instatement of the Ordained Diaconate for Women.

Wijngaards Institute for Catholic Research

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