WOMEN CAN BE PRIESTSheader

Responsive image

HOME

REASONS

DEFY THE POPE?!

DEBATE

MENU

Nederlands/Vlaams Deutsch Francais English language Spanish language Portuguese language Catalan Chinese Czech Malayalam Finnish Igbo
Japanese Korean Romanian Malay language Norwegian Swedish Polish Swahili Chichewa Tagalog Urdu
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

900 - 1000 AD


from a perspective of women in the Church


 

Timeline

before Christ
0-100 AD
100-200
200-300
300-400
400-500
500-600
600-700
700-800
800-900
900-1000
1000-1100
1100-1200
1200-1300
1300-1400
1400-1500
1500-1600
1600-1700
1700-1800
1800-1900
1900-1950
1950-2000
2000-2050

 

Like the previous century, this century belongs to the Dark Ages in the sense that political turmoil reigned throughout Europe and that few written sources survive.

The most important event to happen at the time was the foundation of the Benedictine monastery at Cluny in France in 910.

The abbey's constitution provided it freedom from lay supervision and (after 1016) from jurisdiction of the local bishop. With its independence thus guaranteed, Cluny became the fountainhead of a far-reaching religious evangelization of Europe in the Middle Ages. During its height (c.950-c.1130) it would be second only to the papacy as the chief religious force in Europe.

The Benedictine communities radiated education and reform wherever they were established. And, at the peak of Cluny's influence, nearly 1,000 monasteries and priories located in many countries would perform their ministry under obedience to the abbot of Cluny.

During this century Atto, Bishop of Vercelli (924-961?), wrote to the priest Ambrose presenting two alternative interpretations for the terms ‘women priests’ and ‘women deacons’ mentioned in the ancient records: (a) these women were real ordained ministers; or (b) they were the wives of priests and deacons. Atto says he believes the former opinion (a) is true. See research done by Giorgio Otranto.

Meanwhile Byzantine communities continued to ordain women deacons as can be seen from the ordination rite in the the Sinai codex which dates from this time.



John Wijngaards